Editorial: Holiday cheer doesn’t have to be infectious

Illustration courtesy of The EtCetera

After months of quarantine, paranoia and fear the holiday season seems to be the light at the end of the long dark COVID-19 tunnel. Many of us crave a suspension from our unfortunate reality, a reprieve if even for a moment, while we remember Christmas lights and cherished memories of days gone by.

But we urge you to remember one thing: More than 265,000 American families won’t be whole this year due to COVID-19, and it’s our responsibility to prevent that number from climbing even higher.

This pandemic doesn’t care what time of the year it is and it isn’t going away simply because of a date on the calendar. 

 We aren’t out of the dark yet, and we shouldn’t entertain the thought that COVID-19 is going to end any time in the near future.

More than 1,500 Dallas residents died this year from COVID-19 and new cases are the highest we’ve seen in Dallas County since September. 

The U.S. reported 2,046 COVID related deaths the day before Thanksgiving, the highest one-day death toll the country has reported since May, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

After Memorial Day, several states, including Texas, saw a consistent rise in new cases and hospitalization. This is a trend we should not aim to repeat.

We don’t say this to kill your holiday season, we say this so the holiday season won’t kill you or your loved ones.

In such a tumultuous time we understand the importance of family and we encourage everyone to lean on whatever support system they have. But we beg every one of you to do so safely and responsibly. Too many have died already and too many families will mourn this holiday season.

A few common-sense measures could save countless lives this Christmastime. Wear a mask. Keep social distancing in mind. Keep social gatherings small or chat with family virtually. We are all tired of video calls, but it is safer than meeting in person. Avoid public places, order gifts online and have them sent directly to family or friends.

We may not be able to hold our loved ones this holiday season, and that’s hard, but we take these measures so we might be able to see them again next year and hold them even closer.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*