Editorial: Eastfield, district have made strides in student resources

Martha Especulta/The Et Cetera.

As the semester draws to a close and another academic year ends, we have seen many programs introduced, cut or altered both throughout the district and within our campus with varying levels of success.

A decline in extracurricular activities and lack of accessible resources for students struggling with addiction are hardly the only problems we see at Eastfield.

However, other changes have quickly raised us above several competing college systems. Most effective is the expansion of the Rising Star scholarship program, much of it scheduled to take effect in the fall, which will increase individual funding for qualifying students and expand its services to a wider age group.

This will grant more people the benefits of a college education without the hefty price tag, hopefully bringing us one step closer to the rejected free college program proposed by President Barack Obama in 2015.

The expansion of the Eastfield counseling center, though not without its hiccups, paired well with the increased focus on the Provide Hope and Suicide Education project on campus.

Maintaining mental health is an uphill battle for a shocking amount of students, and these resources can only help point them in the right direction.

The Eastfield Office of Student Engagement and Retention’s decision to introduce the Puente Project, a program intended to provide further support to students in developmental classes, was also a sound change.

We look forward to seeing planned additions to the program in the fall.

Our proposed partnership with the North Texas Food Bank will provide food to countless struggling students.

An additional partnership with Aunt Bertha, a search engine intended to help users find food, housing, work, healthcare and many other necessities, is another testament to the district’s interest in the wellbeing of its students.

There is always room for improvement on campus. For every success story, there runs the risk of failure.

However, we feel confident to say that both the college and the Dallas County Community College District are receptive to the needs of students and will try to do everything in their power to support them, whether it be academically, professionally or financially.

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