Music addiction requires restraint

By Enrique Morales

I am a music addict. I love my addiction for the pleasure it brings, yet I hate it for how much of my time it consumes.

Because of this constant listening, I can recall any song after enough exposure to it. I can play all the songs I want in my mind, without an iPod, cellphone or stereo.

By setting my own words to music, I can even remember more of my obligations than I would otherwise, allowing me to plan my day appropriately to meet my priorities.

I especially enjoy reclining in bed to music.

Some days, I don’t want to do anything else.

I feel tempted to blow off my duties all the time and just rock. I sometimes give in to the temptation, resulting in incomplete essays, lack of studying and unmet commitments.

I always feel horrible afterward and, after failing a paper dismally, set up guidelines to manage my addiction.

I find my methods do help. I hope other addicts can benefit from them as well.

First, I have duration limits, usually about 30-45 minutes long, as that lets me listen to an album. Without a limit, minutes turn to hours and one task turns into millions.

Second, all of my obligations must be met or be on the way to being met before I may listen to music. This gives me an added bonus as I then can worry less.

Finally, motivational chants like “After all your work is done, you will enjoy music more.” Though seemingly childish, are morale-boosting while working.

I do feel fortunate in one regard: My addiction does not physically harm me.

Unlike other addictions, I do not lose brain cells or blacken my lungs when I fulfill my desire. Instead, I feel enraptured, inspired and motivated. I feel that way when I hear beautiful songs. They are songs that bear so many nuances and euphonies. I want to hear them over and over again.

So, overall, I feel lucky to be a music addict.

Music enriches my life with beauty. I feel I’d lack without it.

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