We all pay when you commit campus crimes

Jonathan Wences

Jonathan WencesA group of four students was caught by campus police after attempting to pilfer several bags of chips from the on-site Subway restaurant during the power outage on Jan. 30.

Despite their selfish actions, Subway’s management did not press charges after the students were told by a police officer to return the chips.

While cases like these are infrequent on our campus, this is not the first time someone has attempted to steal from the restaurant.

It’s rather disheartening to hear about occurrences like these, particularly at an institution of higher learning.

The entire purpose of attending a college or university is to make improvements to your life, and committing petty theft is doing just the opposite.

In addition, when you steal from the campus Subway, you are not stealing from a faceless corporation, but from a privately owned establishment.

Tim and Cyndi Pitman are the husband and wife team who currently own the restaurant, and they have been providing meals and jobs to Eastfield students for three years.

Would-be robbers should also realize that there are other consequences for their actions besides police involvement.

A store that is losing money due to theft may be forced to increase its prices. While the owners do try to keep costs reasonable for the benefit of their customers, they still have to pay their employees and maintain their restaurant.

No store manager can do this when customers are stealing from them.

Theft of any kind is not to be taken lightly. Though charges were not pressed against the thieves in this particular instance, this might not be the case for thieves in the future.

Regardless of what you may or may not think, we all pay for the consequences when you steal from the college. With the constant threat of having your phone stolen or your car broken into in the parking lot, it is difficult to feel like your possessions are safe on campus.

When you commit a campus crime, you are not only harming your reputation, but harming the employees and customers who will have to deal with the mess you have left behind.

Is an 89-cent bag of chips really worth all that trouble?

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