Falsely crying racism only makes it harder to spot

By Dan Luna

With actual racists making their ideologies public in the political arena these recent months, it has been painfully obvious that accusations of racism have lost their power.

Recently that reality has been clouded by accusations of racism where none exists.

It’s an attempt to distract people from real racists.

This is probably done to cause a divide between the people while allowing racists to hide behind the new false definition of racism.

As a Mexican-American who has experienced actual racism, these false accusations are an insult and make light of racism.

This new definition of racism tears down our basic understanding of what it is and broadens it to include things that would normally not be seen as racist.

From Trump’s wall, to hairstyles, jokes, cops and governmental aid, everything is racist.

Liberals began this tactic to defend their views rather than using logic to “Trump” their opponent’s arguments.

They simply shout “racist,” and paint their opponents as people who aren’t worth hearing.

In their new definition, racism can happen without the “racist” person even realizing they’re doing it.

These microaggressions are absurd attempts to say that you are aggressed, even if no aggression took place.

Microaggressions have become an excuse for violence and racism.

For example, lately, saying “I don’t like Mexican food” is seen as racist.

On Aug. 2, Isabelle Khoo wrote an article for the Huffington Post Canada on a young girl who wore a kimono and posted it on Tumblr showing her tea party.

Liberals, or more accurately Social Justice Warriors, were quick to attack her saying that what she was doing was racist.

This type of accusation is new, because in the past racists were a very specific group of people.

Being racist meant hating a particular group of people due to the color of their skin.

It was simple and that made it easy to spot actual racists.

This traditional definition allows us to target actual racism, instead of people who acknowledge that differences exist.

Someone saying “that black guy” or “that Mexican kid,” under this traditional definition wasn’t racist and shouldn’t be considered racist.

Do those phrases mean they hate black people or tan people?

No, it doesn’t.

Perhaps it’s dumb thing to say, and shows a lack of adjectives in their vocabulary, but it’s far from racism.

Racist phrases inherently aim to show hatred toward a particular group.

This is why racial slurs are derogatory terms and not descriptive terms.

They make everyone from that group seem to be less human.

True racism is an ideology that believes people of certain skin color, ethnicity or culture are worth less than other humans.

They don’t think that those humans have intrinsic value.

Only their group has value, while the rest deserve to die, or at the very least live apart from them.

These liberals have used racism to attack ideas they don’t like, and thus censor free speech.

Thanks to their politically correct culture preaching, most of us now walk on eggshells and become easily offended by the simplest of words.

If we continue to follow their false ideology, not only will we kill free speech, but we will allow the true face of racism to hide behind the large group they have falsely labeled as racist.

It gives racists courage and fuels their hatred towards the groups they hate.

We can’t give them that privilege and should call out the real racism.

If things continue to go the way they are going, we will live in a divided world. We can even see modern examples of segregation.

The Washington Times had an article over the Berkeley protest because they demanded “advocating the creation of physical spaces segregated by race and gender identity.”

It propels the agenda of racist ideologies that want to live separate lives. We need to return to the traditional definition of racism and stop being so sensitive about things we don’t like to hear. Instead, let’s unite to call out real hatred-fueled racist ideologies.

Dan Luna is a staff photographer for
The Et Cetera and an accounting major

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